“A Time for Choosing” a California Governor; An American President

 

Today in History, November 8, 1966:

A Hollywood actor and Screen Actor’s Guild President is elected for the first time to his first term as California Governor, defeating Democrat political veteran Governor Pat Brown (yes, Governor Jerry Brown’s father.)

On October 27, 1964 Ronald Reagan had given a speech entitled, “A Time for Choosing” while campaigning for failed Presidential candidate Barry Goldwater.  That “moment in time” is referred to in political circles as “The Speech” because its dynamic message and Reagan’s powerful delivery, while it didn’t succeed for Goldwater, propelled former Democrat Reagan into a fireball career which would lead him not only to the Governorship, but to two terms as one of America’s most beloved and respected Presidents.  He was so revered by the American people, that it is only natural for leftist to revile him.  He is an excellent example of why you must watch closely for bias when researching individuals and events.

Here are a couple more versions of “The Speech”, one of it in its entirety if you are interested, and one which has been adapted to more modern events.  I share this because that one speech echoed down through history for other events…including “I hear you!  And the people who knocked these buildings down will hear from ALL of us soon!”

 

 

Rawhide Down!!

Today in History, March 30, 1981:

“I hope you’re all Republicans”. President Ronald Reagan quipped to the medical team preparing to operate on him at George Washington University Hospital after he had been shot. “Today, sir, we all are.” ”

“Ronny” was leaving the D.C. Hilton where he had given a speech to Union members when he, a Secret Service agent, a D.C. Police Officer, and Press Secretary James Brady were shot by a man attempting to impress Jodie Foster.

Reagan showed his usual good form and humor in the hospital. When he awoke, a nurse was holding his hand; he looked up and asked, “Does Nancy know about us?” When Nancy arrived, he commented, “Honey, I forgot to duck” (quoting Jack Dempsey). While waiting for surgery, he stated, “All in all, I’d rather be in Philadelphia” (W.C. Fields quote). Within two weeks the President was back at work.

I’m glad we were allowed to have his honor, humor, positive attitude and leadership as long as we did.

“We Will Be As A City Upon A Hill”

Today in History, January 11, 1989:

President Ronald Reagan gives his farewell speech from the White House,

“…And that’s about all I have to say tonight, except for one thing. The past few days when I’ve been at that window upstairs, I’ve thought a bit of the “shining city upon a hill.” The phrase comes from John Winthrop, who wrote it to describe the America he imagined. What he imagined was important because he was an early Pilgrim, an early freedom man. He journeyed here on what today we’d call a little wooden boat; and like the other Pilgrims, he was looking for a home that would be free.

I’ve spoken of the shining city all my political life, but I don’t know if I ever quite communicated what I saw when I said it. But in my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, wind-swept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That’s how I saw it, and see it still.”

Reagan had spoken of the “Shining city on a hill” throughout his career, and in a 1974 speech he quoted Winthrop; “Standing on the tiny deck of the Arabella in 1630 off the Massachusetts coast, John Winthrop said,

“We will be as a city upon a hill. The eyes of all people are upon us, so that if we deal falsely with our God in this work we have undertaken and so cause Him to withdraw His present help from us, we shall be made a story and a byword throughout the world.”

What will we leave behind when we “Walk off into the city streets?”